Thursday, 28 May 2015

What Is A Twin Peaks Blue Rose?

I've been asked to explain where the name of my blog, The Blue Rose, has come from and why it relates to Twin Peaks. Fanatics, don't feel patronized. I know it's obvious to some of us Twin Peaks obsessives! But I want this blog to be a good guide for people who are beginning to discover Twin Peaks for the first time - I'm predicting an entire new generation will become fans of Twin Peaks this year and next, before the Showtime revival hits our screens.

The blue rose doesn't actually appear in Twin Peaks the TV series, but in Fire Walk With Me, the prequel film David Lynch made after the show was cancelled. Fire Walk With Me takes us back in time to before Laura's death and investigates what happened in her final days leading up to it. It is seriously worth watching but incredibly dark.

Gordon Cole of the FBI (played by David Lynch himself) uses the blue rose as a secret FBI symbol to represent that a case is un-explained and under particularly unusual circumstances. These cases are shrouded in mystery with elements of the supernatural. In reality blue roses are modified to be blue, they do not exist in nature. This is why they have come to represent a symbol of mystery, not just in the world of Twin Peaks, but in popular culture in general.

The Twin Peaks Wikia page has some more interesting points about the Blue Rose cases but this does contain some SPOILERS so click with caution. They interestingly mention that director David Lynch's Los Angeles home is on a street named 'Blue Rose Street' but I can't find it on Google Maps... How very mysterious.

At last year's Twin Peaks UK Festival attendees were given really pretty blue roses upon arrival and I've kept mine. It sits on my mantelpiece next to my Laura Palmer prom picture (I'm really revealing what a creep I am here!). And that's where the inspiration for my blog name, The Blue Rose, came. Next thing is to design a banner, or rather, find someone who can design a fabulous banner for me!